Your question: Can I have a baby if I have HPV?

Will this affect my baby? It’s not likely. Women who have or have had HPV — the human papilloma virus — have successful pregnancies and their babies are not harmed by their HPV infections. HPV is a very common sexually transmitted infection that affects millions of women and men around the world.

Is it safe to get pregnant with HPV?

The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) by itself should not affect your ability to get pregnant. But in some cases, having HPV can increase your risk of developing precancerous or cancerous cells in your cervix, which could affect both your fertility and your ability to carry a baby to term.

Can someone with HPV give birth?

HPV and Childbirth

The risk of HPV transmission to the baby during childbirth is very low. Even if babies do get the HPV virus, their bodies usually clear the virus on their own. Most of the time, a baby born to a woman with genital warts does not have HPV-related complications.

Does pregnancy make HPV worse?

HPV, the Genital Human Papillomavirus, is a viral infection that manifest with genital warts. During pregnancy, changing hormone levels can make warts grow faster than usual.

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Should I tell my partner I have HPV?

Do I need to tell my partner? This is entirely your decision. Most men and women with HPV infection carry the infection without ever being aware of it. HPV infection does not need to be treated and in 95% cases, you would get rid of it through your immunity.

Should I stop taking the pill if I have HPV?

An analysis of case-control studies has found that use of oral contraceptives for ≥ 5 years in women with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer.

Should I panic if I have HPV?

Being diagnosed with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) can be a nerve-wracking experience. You don’t need to panic, but you do need to be informed.

Is HPV permanent?

Depending on the type of HPV that you have, the virus can linger in your body for years. In most cases, your body can produce antibodies against the virus and clear the virus within one to two years. Most strains of HPV go away permanently without treatment.

How do you get HPV out of your system?

HPV can clear up naturally – as there is no cure for the underlying HPV infection, the only way to get rid of HPV is to wait for the immune system to clear the virus naturally.

Can I give birth naturally with HPV?

Simply having the HPV virus in your system shouldn’t impact your pregnancy in most cases – and your baby won’t contract it. If you have genital warts caused by HPV, your doctor may watch you more closely, though women with this condition usually have healthy pregnancies and can even deliver vaginally.

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Can I breastfeed if I have HPV?

People who breastfeed may worry about spreading the virus to babies through breast milk. However, for most people living with HPV, breastfeeding is safe, and the benefits outweigh any potential risks.

Does pregnancy help clear HPV?

Our study shows that postpartum pregnant women clear HR–HPV faster than non-pregnant women after a same period of follow-up.

Can a faithful couple get HPV?

Sex partners who have been together tend to share HPV, even when both partners do not show signs of HPV. Having HPV does not mean that a person or their partner is having sex outside the current relationship. There is no treatment to eliminate HPV itself. HPV is usually dealt with by your body’s immune system.

Is HPV a STI or STD?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States. HPV vaccines can prevent some of the health effects HPV causes. Basic fact sheets answer general questions about STDs.

Does HPV affect men?

Most men who get HPV never have symptoms. The infection usually goes away by itself. But, if HPV does not go away, it can cause genital warts or certain kinds of cancer. Talk to your healthcare provider about anything new or unusual on your penis, scrotum, anus, mouth, or throat.